Books about WWII

July 30, 2016

I don’t know if there are more novels these days set in World War II, or if I just happen to be coming across them more, but I recently finished three of them, each told from a very different perspective.

Liberation Road: A Novel of World War II and the Red Ball Express, by David Robbins, follows the experiences of two American non-combatants from when they come ashore at Omaha Beach. Joe Amos Biggs is an African-American who left college to enlist and who longs to be able to fight alongside the white men. Ben Kahn is a chaplain who had fought in the trenches in World War I, whose son is a B-17 pilot shot down over France and now MIA, and who is motivated by desire for revenge on the Germans. Occasionally there are also passages told from the point of view of “White Dog,” an American pilot shot down over France, who prefers the comfortable life he has found as a black marketeer in occupied Paris to rejoining his comrades in arms.

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Books: Ordinary Heroes

September 13, 2015

The library has a shelf set up near our Toastmasters meeting room, always with some theme and books connected in some way to that theme. One week recently, it was about heroes. Perhaps there were some books about superheroes; I don’t really remember. But the one that caught my eye was Scott Turow’s Ordinary Heroes.

I had read nothing by Scott Turow previously (though I have thought about reading Ultimate Punishment, which is an essay on the death penalty rather than a novel). But I had an idea of his reputation as a writer, so this looked like something worth reading.

Like several other books I have read recently, it deals with World War II. But while those other novels tell the story from the perspective of civilians or spies, this recounts the experiences of a lawyer in the Judge Advocate General’s Corp.

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Books: The Sandcastle Girls

April 17, 2015

The Sandcastle Girls was our book club’s selection last month, but I found it difficult, immediately after reading it, to figure out what to say about it. There is so much I could say about the awful tragedy recounted in the book, both at a personal level for characters in the book and for the millions of people affected by the genocide of the Armenian people.

Then again, what is there I could say that would really do justice to the subject? Chris Bohjalian does it far better, bringing to life an ugly chapter of history that has been largely forgotten by most of the world. The stark reality of human suffering is depicted in more grim detail than I might have liked, but the fact that people do such horrible things to one another is reason to tell them, not to ignore them.

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Books: Winter of the World

July 27, 2014

As I had read in book reviews that Winter of the World picks up where Fall of Giants left off, I was surprised and somewhat disappointed to find out that this was not really so. There is a gap of nine years, with the sequel beginning in 1933 with Hitler’s rise to power. Perhaps in terms of world events nine years isn’t so long, but I was expecting continuity in terms of the characters.

Nine years is long enough that the main characters of the first book have receded into the background and it is through the eyes of their children that we see events unfold. The parents are there, but they are no longer very interesting. And there is little explanation for how they got to where they are now. Grigori, in particular, seems much too content with his comfortable position in life as a general in the Red Army. I realize that it would have been dangerous for him to oppose Stalin (he escaped being purged by not being important enough at the time), but one can’t help but wonder what happened to his thirst for a just society.

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Books: Robopocalypse

May 8, 2014

I checked this book on CD out of the library at the librarian’s recommendation, when I was looking for something we could listen to during our trip to Michigan and back for Zach’s graduation. I mentioned that we all like science fiction, so Pam suggested Robopocalypse.

It’s a reasonably interesting story (at least it kept me alert while driving hour after hour, although Jon managed to fall asleep a few times while it played). We would have preferred less coarse language, but it likely is fairly realistic considering that the book is all about fighting a war.

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Movies: Ender’s Game

November 10, 2013

The problem with going to a movie made from a great book is that you know the movie will inevitably fall short, but you still want to see the story played out on the big screen. Because the author of Ender’s Game (the book) was one of the producers of Ender’s Game (the movie), I knew the movie would get the key things right. But I still had to keep reminding myself that the movie is a separate work, and that it can be good in different ways from the book, even while lacking so much that made the book great.

The first thing that surprised me was that the movie started with Ender as a preteen rather than a 6-year-old. To see a boy of around twelve use the violence necessary to keep a bully from ever attacking him again just does not have the same impact as seeing that happen with a mere 6-year-old. Still, it makes its point, while bowing to the reality that finding a much younger boy with the ability to play this role convincingly would be as hard as finding a real-life Ender Wiggin.

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Books: 1776

September 7, 2013

Back in July, I read a blog post at First Things presenting a Scottish preacher’s perspective on the Declaration of Independence. It questions whether the “self-evident” truths the document refers to really are self-evident in any meaningful way.

Curious, I searched for other online resources regarding how the struggle for independence was viewed by its opponents. This article made claims that bothered me.

It is true that freedom is enshrined in English law, which therefore legitimised the colonists’ right to pursue independence, but only through the wishes of a majority, without which it was illegal; and the rebels were far from commanding a majority.

I had always supposed that Loyalists were few in number while the majority of the population favored independence. Yet I read here that Loyalists made up as much as 40% of the population, with the rebel leaders having the support of only about 27%, and the remaining third being those who did not want to be on the losing side and would choose their allegiance based on who seemed more likely to win.

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