Books: Call the Midwife

October 2, 2016

Tomorrow is our monthly book club meeting, and I just realized I had not written a post on last month’s book, Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth. It’s not a book I would have thought of reading otherwise (mostly as I hadn’t heard of it before), but it was an enjoyable and fascinating read.

It is a view not only into the world of midwifery, but also into the lives of people living in postwar London Docklands. Worth recounts the stories of a wide variety of people, both the nuns (she lives and works at the convent of St. Raymund Nonnatus) and the women they serve and their families. There are a number of memorable characters, especially Conchita Warren and her very large family.

It is also a view into a historical era that exists now only in books and in memories. The slums have since been torn down and families moved elsewhere, ending a way of life that was very hard but that had its positive aspects also. The practice of medicine has changed a great deal since then also, so some of the practices of the midwives in the book seem strange to us in the 21st century. (I had never heard of boiling urine before, to test for pre-eclampsia.) Read the rest of this entry »


Books: Me Before You

July 30, 2016

Me Before You is the sort of book I would never have picked up on my own. Even knowing it would be the subject for discussion at our monthly book club meeting on Monday, I put off starting it until two days ago. Something about the cover photo of a beautiful young woman and a handsome man staring into each other’s faces just put me off somehow. And that title – sounds like some character is obviously self-absorbed though I didn’t know who it would be.

Note: it’s pretty hard to say much more about the book without giving some hint of the ending, so if you haven’t read it and want to read without knowing what will happen, stop here.

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Books: I’ll Give You the Sun

July 20, 2016

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson was July’s selection for our book club at the library. I always wonder, when we get the next month’s book, whether I’ll like it. There has been a lot of variety in the books we’ve read over the past two years, and some have taken much more effort to finish than others. (One I just refused to read after the first twenty pages. As it happened that month’s meeting was cancelled anyway.)

I had left this one to read over the July 4th weekend, reasoning that I would have plenty of time to read and it would be easier to get through a book when I had fewer demands on my time. As it turned out, it was a very easy read, and I got interested enough in the characters that I somewhat reluctantly set it aside when the parade started. (With a son in the marching band, we had to get there way early. Naturally I had a book to read while we waited.)

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Books: A Song I Knew by Heart

February 14, 2016

An online friend told me about this modern adaptation of the story of Ruth and Naomi. A Song I Knew by Heart by Bret Lott explores Naomi’s grief after losing first her husband Eli, then her son Mahlon. When she decides to move from Massachusetts back to South Carolina where she had lived as a child, her daughter-in-law Ruth insists on going with her.

Unlike the story in the Old Testament, there is no other son and no Orpah who agrees to go back to her family. Ruth has no family to go back to, so going with Naomi is staying with the little family she does have – and acquiring a large new family when they get to South Carolina.

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Books: Barchester Towers

September 7, 2015

I picked up this audiobook some time ago and was intrigued by what I read on the back cover about it. But it said it was a sequel, so I figured I ought to read the first book first to properly enjoy it. And the library didn’t have the first book on CDs.

A few weeks ago, though, I was chatting with my friend who works at the library (and leads our monthly book club), and she was suggesting books on CD I might enjoy. One she suggested was Barchester Towers, and she assured me that it didn’t matter whether I had read the first book, and that this one was better anyway.

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Books: The Kite Runner

August 14, 2015

I had for some time been meaning to read the novels by Khaled Hosseini, beginning with The Kite Runner, which members of my book club had highly praised. But I was hesitant to read a book described as “heart wrenching,” “devastating,” and “brutal,” even if it is also called “beautiful” and “inspiring.” I took it off the shelf in the library one day, started walking toward the check-out counter, then after a few steps returned and put it back, deciding I would wait until some time when I felt ready for that challenge.

I’m not sure just when I would have decided I was ready, but my son was assigned the novel as summer reading for his pre-AP Language and Literature class. I don’t generally read the books he is reading for school, but in this case I wanted to read it first, to know what he would be encountering in the novel and to help him deal with whatever difficult issues arose from it.

It is well-written, but I admit that I was having to push myself to read it in the early chapters. When I discovered it on CDs in the library, I decided that would be an ideal way to get through the book faster than my son would. (Not that he read it through quickly. There are so many more interesting things for a teenage boy to do during summer vacation.)

I knew from reviews I had read before purchasing the book that it contains a scene of homosexual rape, and I was not looking forward to that scene – though it was obvious from the first page when it would happen and I was sort of relieved to finally reach that point instead of continuing to anticipate it. It is awful, what happened, but at least once I had read it, I could stop worrying about how bad it would be.

I also was relieved that it is not a graphic description – in fact, my son did not recognize it for what it was at all. I had to explain later that no, Assef did not “beat up” Hassan. My son is sixteen, old enough now to learn that such things happen. But I also felt good, in a way, that such things were so outside his previous experience, even vicariously in books or movies, that the thought of such a thing did not occur to him from Hosseini’s spare description of the event.

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Books: Wonder

July 19, 2015

This was our book club selection this past month. There seems to be general agreement that books to read during the summer should be fairly undemanding, both in terms of being quick and easy to read, and not dealing with difficult or painful themes.

It hadn’t actually been the intended selection, but whatever that was, there was some problem with the book order and thus the need to come up with another idea quickly. Wonder was recommended by the children’s librarian (it is marketed to middle school children), and it turned out to be a good choice.

One could argue, of course, about whether the topic is in fact difficult or painful. The main character, Auggie, is a ten-year-old with a facial deformity so bad that even people who want to be accepting of his differences may flinch when they first see it.

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